Exploring moths as ecological indicators of health and connectedness in our natural world.

Rights: University of Waikato Published 29 June 2018, Updated 2 July 2018 Referencing Hub media

This timeline follows the citizen science project that aims to engage teachers, students and whānau with moths and, through moths, with nature and science. Ahi Pepe MothNet started with four schools in Otago and now covers all of New Zealand.

Note: To use this interactive timeline, move your cursor or finger over any of the labelled boxes and select to get further information. You can also scroll forwards and backwards or use the arrows in the top section.

Transcript

November 2015 – Ahi Pepe MothNet

Shedding Light on the Night receives PSP funding to investigate nocturnal biodiversity in the Otago region. Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research, Orokonui Ecosanctuary and the University of Otago partner with four schools.

Acknowledgement: University of Waikato

March 2016 – Identification guide

The science team completes the prototype design of a user-friendly, laminated, foldout beginners’ guide to the common moths of Otago.

Acknowledgement: Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research

May 2016 – Moth data

From March to May, the science team and schools collect moth distribution data and field data for the artificial light experiment.

Acknowledgement: Rachel O’Connell, Clutha Valley Primary School

May 2016 – Problem solving

Repeating the experiments due to weather conditions, differing phases of the Moon, dead batteries or empty traps are part of the investigation process. Students learn to problem solve as a result.

Acknowledgement: University of Waikato

May 2016 – Extended funding

Unlocking Curious Minds funding comes through for a second year and expands to include 14 South Island schools. The theme is identifying, strengthening and restoring connections.

Acknowledgement: Ahi Pepe MothNet

July 2016 – NZ International Science Festival

During the NZ International Science Festival, the team learns the value of using creative ways to engage children. Face painting is a popular activity as children closely observe the moths to choose which one to become.

Acknowledgement: Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research

October 2016 – Resources in te reo

In collaboration with Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ōtepoti, the team develops Kā Puka Whakamārama o Te Pepe Nui, a field guide to macro-moths in the Kāi Tahu dialect. There are guides for four South Island regions.

Acknowledgement: Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research

February 2017 – Ahi Pepe MothNet radio show

Tamariki from Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ōtepoti and Dr Barbara Anderson present a mix of science and te reo each week on a local radio show.

Acknowledgement: Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research

February 2016 – Ahi Pepe MothNet – Aotearoa

Unlocking Curious Minds, the Biological Heritage National Science Challenge and Landcare Research fund the project to cover all of New Zealand.

Acknowledgement: Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research

May 2017 – Crazy & Ambitious conference, Wellington

Dr Anderson and tamariki from Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ōtepoti present their work at the Biological Heritage National Science Challenge conference.

Acknowledgement: New Zealand’s Biological Heritage National Science Challenge 2017

July 2017 – international conference, Canada

Six tamariki present Science Through an Indigenous Lens – A Moth Study at the World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Education.

Acknowledgement: Marcia Cassidy

March 2018 – North Island guides

New guides are produced in te reo Māori and English. There are guides for four North Island regions.

Acknowledgement: Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research

Funding

The Ahi Pepe MothNet project received funding through Otago Science into Action – the Otago pilot of the Participatory Science Platform (PSP), which is part of the Curious Minds initiative and funded by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. The PSP is currently being implemented as a pilot in three areas: South Auckland, Taranaki and Otago.

Ahi Pepe MothNet has also received additional funding from Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research; Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ōtepoti; Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu; Te Tumu, University of Otago; Department of Geography, University of Otago; Orokonui Ecosanctuary; Otago Museum; and New Zealand’s Biological Heritage National Science Challenge.

The government’s national strategic plan for Science in Society, A Nation of Curious Minds – He Whenua Hihiri i te Mahara, is a government initiative jointly led by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, Ministry of Education and Office of the Prime Minister’s Chief Science Advisor.